Events & Highlights

Upcoming Celestial and Eddington Lodge Events

December 2020

8th December, 2020

Moon Third Quarter

13th December, 2020

Geminids meteor shower peak - Plenty of bright meteors, few trains

14th December, 2020

New Moon

21st December, 2020

Great Conjunction 2020: Jupiter and Saturn meet on Solstice

21st December, 2020

Moon First Quarter

30th December, 2020

Full Moon

January 2021

2nd January, 2021

Quadrantids Meteor Shower - An above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak

13th January, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

28th January, 2021

Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 18.6 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

28th January, 2021

Full Moon.

February 2021

11th February, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

27th February, 2021

Full Moon.

March 2021

6th March, 2021

Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

13th March, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

20th March, 2021

March Equinox. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

20th March, 2021

Venus at Greatest Western Elongation. This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

28th March, 2021

Full Moon.

April 2021

12th April, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

22nd April, 2021

Lyrids meteor shower peak - Bright fast meteors, some with trains. Associated with Comet Thatcher

27th April, 2021

Full Moon, Supermoon.

May 2021

6th May, 2021

Eta Aquariids meteor shower peak - Low in sky. Associated with Comet Halley

11th May, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

17th May, 2021

Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

26th May, 2021

Full Moon, Supermoon.

June 2021

10th June, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

21st June, 2021

June Solstice. This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

24th June, 2021

Full Moon, Supermoon.

July 2021

4th July, 2021

Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

10th July, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

24th July, 2021

Full Moon.

28th July, 2021

Delta Aquariids meteor shower Peak - Steady stream of meteors over several days but a low rate per hour

August 2021

7th August, 2021

Saturn at Opposition. Saturn will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons.

8th August, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

12th August, 2021

Perseids meteor shower peak - Many bright fast meteors with trains. Associated with Comet Swift-Tuttle

19th August, 2021

Jupiter at Opposition. Jupiter will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

22nd August, 2021

Full Moon. Blue Moon

September 2021

7th September, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

14th September, 2021

Neptune at Opposition. This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune. Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

14th September, 2021

Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

20th September, 2021

Full Moon.

22nd September, 2021

September Equinox. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of fall in the Northern Hemisphere.

October 2021

6th October, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

7th October, 2021

Draconids Meteor Shower. The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour. This year, the nearly new moon will leave dark skies for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be in the early evening.

20th October, 2021

Full Moon.

21st October, 2021

Orionids meteor shower peak - Fast with fine trains. Associated with Comet Halley. The full moon will be a problem this year for the Orionids. Its glare will block out all but the brightest meteors.

25th October, 2021

Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

29th October, 2021

Venus at Greatest Eastern Elongation. This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

November 2021

4th November, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

4th November, 2021

Taurids Meteor Shower. The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour. The new moon will leave dark skies this year for what should be an excellent show.

5th November, 2021

Uranus at Opposition. This is the best time to view Uranus. Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

17th November, 2021

Leonids meteor shower peak - Fast bright meteors with fine trains. Associated with Comet Tempel-Tuttle. Unfortunately the nearly full moon will dominate the sky this year, blocking all but the brightest meteors.

19th November, 2021

Full Moon.

December 2021

4th December, 2021

New Moon - This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

13th December, 2021

Geminids meteor shower peak - Plenty of bright meteors, few trains. The waxing gibbous moon will block out most of the fainter meteors this year. But the Geminids are so numerous and bright that this could still be a good show.

19th December, 2021

Full Moon.

21st December, 2021

December Solstice. The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun. This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere.

21st December, 2021

Ursids Meteor Shower. The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour. The nearly full moon will be a problem this year, blocking all but the brightest meteors.

The Best Time to Stay

The best time to observe the stars is when the skies are at their clearest and darkest, and the nights are at their longest. This means that the months of late August to mid April provide a better chance to see more and visitors have a longer window each night in which to observe the night sky. Different times of year also offer a different perspective of the sky with some constellations and objects only visible in certain seasons. This means that returning guests will often have new objects and sights to observe.

Moon Phases

The phases of the moon can make a big difference to astronomy. The bright reflective light of a full moon can drown out most of the fainter objects in the night sky so staying when the moon is full should be avoided if possible. The best time for astronomy would be around a new moon when the night is at its darkest, leading to the best conditons for observation. The lead up to the first quater can also be a great time for stargazing, especially with younger childern as the moon will be available and is always a great sight for young minds. As a general rule, avoiding one week either side of the full moon would be best. That's not to say that we can't do astronomy during those times but there may be more of a limit on what can be seen.

Events

Meteor Showers

There are several well known, predictable and sometimes very strong meteor showers during the year. These are a great time to get out into our dark skies and spot the fireballs hurtling through our atmosphere, some of which will also leave trails or trains in the sky. Meteor showers that also coincide with or are close to a new moon are usually the most spectacular. Meteor showers generally last between a few days and a couple of weeks. We have provided the peak shower dates opposite - this is when the amount of meteors should be at its maximum rate. 

Events

Conjunctions and eclipses

From time to time we do get treated to conjunctions and eclipses, both the rare solar and the more common lunar. A conjunction is when two objects in the night sky appear together. This is most often two of our own solar system planets, a combination of a planet and a deep sky object or a combination of a planet and our moon. Although rare, having the opportunity to view two of our closest neighbours together, or seeing a planet disappear behing the the view of our moon, is not to be missed. A lunar eclipse is when the Earth is positioned between the Sun and the Moon, turning the Moon a deep red colour in the night sky. The rarer solar eclipse is when the Moon is positioned between the Sun and the Earth, turning day into an eerie twilight. Eclipses can happen as either a total or a partial eclipse.

Events

Comets

All through the year comets make their way through our solar system, brightening and darkening as they are affected by the Sun. These can be both great visual and astrophotography targets for guests and we aim to provide details of when they might be at their best to see.

Events